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Welcome to the Canberra Region Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History.

The ASSLH aims to encourage the study, teaching and research of labour history and to encourage the preservation of labour archives.

This website was designed by Webtrax with the assistance of the Bede Nairn Fund. It aims to present a selection of articles and publications that can easily be accessed by students, teachers and others wanting to know more about labour history and politics.

The ASSLH encourages open debate on questions relating to labour history and politics. The articles published on this website do not necessarily reflect the views of the ASSLH and its officers. New contributions welcome. Links to other websites do not necessarily imply an endorsement of the content of those websites.

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COMING EVENTS

Canberra Branch Annual General Meeting

Please also note our Annual General Meeting for 2022 will be combined with Christmas drinks. Both will be held at 5:30 pm, on 7 December 2022, at King O’Malley’s pub in Civic.

The only addition to our agenda beyond routine business is a proposal from the federal society to hold the biennial national conference in Canberra around this time next year.

Federal ASSLH Annual General Meeting

The federal society will hold its AGM on Sunday 4 December 2022, staring 4.00 pm, via Zoom.

This is the Zoom link for the meeting: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/87153059404?pwd=aXVGUmw2eFUrMzVoY2dRUDJVYk9Wdz09
 
And the agenda is as follows:
Minutes of the 2021 Annual General Meeting
Joint President, Secretary & Treasurer’s Report
Labour History Editor’s Report
Branch Reports (by circulation)
Branch sub-committee Report
Election of Officers
2023 ASSLH Conference
Other Business

All Financial Branch members are also members of the federal society and are entitled to participate fully in the federal AGM.

 
                            
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Recent articles

Here are some of our recent articles. To search the complete list, click on the Articles and Publications menu.

  • When the Australian ruling class embraced fascism November 21, 2022 - Originally published in Marxist Left Review 13, Summer 2017 When the Australian ruling class embraced fascism Louise O’Shea It is commonplace today to treat the far right and far left as mirror images of each other: both extreme, ideologically rigid, intolerant and similarly isolated from the sensible mainstream. But history demonstrates that there is little […]
  • Before the Teals, the DLP rewrote politics August 13, 2022 - This article first appeared in The Canberra Times of 5 July 2022 Before the teals, the DLP rewrote politics by Stephen Holt The election of sixteen House of Representatives crossbench members, including six or so Teal independents, on 21 May 2022 signals a big shift in the underlying structure of Australian politics.
  • Bob Hawke and Canberra’s ‘factional wars’ April 11, 2022 - By Stephen Holt (An edited version of this article appeared in The Canberra Times (Public Sector Informant) of 5 April 2022) There is an intriguing reference to political shenanigans in Cold War Canberra in Troy Bramston’s new biography of Bob Hawke. Bramston in an early chapter refers to a letter dated 24 October 1956. Written […]
  • Slavery in Australia – Convicts, Emigrants, Aborigines August 18, 2021 - Slavery in Australia – Convicts, Emigrants, Aborigines KM Dallas Kenneth McKenzie Dallas (1902- 1988) was a Tasmanian historian, teacher, writer and socialist. In September 1968, the Tasmanian Historical Research Association (THRA) published a collection of three articles by Dallas, each offering a different perspective on aspects of Australian history. The third of the three: ‘Slavery […]
  • The fallacy of remoteness August 18, 2021 - The fallacy of remoteness KM Dallas Kenneth McKenzie Dallas (1902- 1988) was a Tasmanian historian, teacher, writer and socialist. In September 1968, the Tasmanian Historical Research Association (THRA) published a collection of three articles by Dallas, each offering a different perspective on aspects of Australian history. The second of the three: ‘The fallacy of remoteness’ […]

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